Frequently Asked Questions

Go RVing's partners were once first-time RVers too and we are here to help you get started. The questions below are some of the most common from new RVers have and cover a number of different topics.
  • Do I need a special driver's license to tow a travel trailer?

    For most RVs, all that is needed is a regular driver’s license which makes purchasing an RV very accessible. Driver’s license requirements vary by state so you should always check the specific regulations in your state. In most states, RVs weighing under 26,000 pounds don’t require a special license however, there are some additional requirements in some states such as a skills or a written test to drive very large motorhomes. You should always double-check with the state’s DMV for updated information as these rules sometimes change.

  • Do I need a special driver's license to tow a 5th wheel?

    For most RVs, all that is needed is a regular driver’s license. Driver’s license requirements vary by state so you should always check the specific regulations in your state. There are a small number of states that have additional requirements such as a skills or a written test to drive the very large motorhomes. When towing a 5th wheel, it is important to match the loaded weight of the RV to the towing capacity of the tow vehicle. Consult your dealer or owner’s manual for details and have the tow hitch professionally installed.

  • Do I need a special driver’s license to tow a sport utility RV?

    Sport utility RVs come in all sizes ranging from a small travel trailer up to a 5th wheel and even a class A. For most RVs, all that is needed is a regular driver’s license but driver’s license requirements vary by state so you should always check the specific regulations in your state. There are a small number of states that have additional requirements such as a skills or a written test to drive the very large motorhomes.

  • Do I need a special driver's license to drive a truck camper?

    While the majority of states do not require a CDL or special driver's license to drive or tow an RV, there are a few that have additional skills testing beyond certain weight classes. For example, if driving or towing more than 26,000 lbs. in Kansas, Maryland, Nevada, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, and Wyoming, there are some additional requirements. Other states, like California, have additional requirements for length as well as weight. Driver’s license requirements vary by state so you should always check the specific regulations in your state. 

  • How do I figure out the capacity of my tow vehicle and hitch?

    When towing an RV, it is important to match the loaded weight of the RV to the towing capacity of the tow vehicle and this includes factoring in the added weight of the equipment you are bringing. Consult your dealer or owner’s manual for details and have the tow hitch professionally installed.

  • I have never towed a vehicle before. How do I learn to do it? 

    It may seem intimidating to tow an RV for the first time but towing is a skill set like driving a car, riding a bike, or mastering anything you ever set out to learn. There are several ways that you can prepare but one of the easiest ways to learn is by contacting your local dealer. Many dealerships offer test drives and even offer classes on how to tow an RV. This article is also full of tips on how to get started.

  • Is it difficult to drive a Class A?

    While it may seem daunting for new RVers, the controls in the cockpit of an RV look similar to your average car. Side view cameras, back-up cameras, and collision avoidance systems are options on most motorized RVs. This usually gives first-timers the confidence to get started and ultimately, learning to drive a motorized RV is a skill that becomes second nature with a little practice. Here are some tips to keep in mind when you are getting started.

  • Do I need a special driver's license to drive a Class A?

    For most RVs, all that is needed is a regular driver’s license which makes purchasing an RV very accessible. Driver’s license requirements vary by state so you should always check the specific regulations in your state. There are a small number of states that have additional requirements such as a skills or a written test to drive the very large motorhomes. Your local department of motor vehicles will have specifics to help you get started.

  • Do I need a special driver's license to drive a class B?

    For most RVs, all that is needed is a regular driver’s license which makes purchasing a Class B a great option. Driver’s license requirements vary by state so you should always check the specific regulations in your state. You should always check with your DMV for your state's regulations. 

  • Is it difficult to drive a Class C?

    While it may seem daunting from the outside, the controls in the cockpit of an RV look similar to your average car and side view, and back up cameras are standard on most motorized RVs. This usually gives first-timers the confidence to get started and ultimately, learning to drive a motorized RV is a skill that becomes second nature with a little practice. Here are some tips to keep in mind when you are getting started.

  • Do I need a special driver's license to drive a Class C?

    For most RVs, all that is needed is a regular driver’s license which makes purchasing a Class C very accessible. Driver’s license requirements vary by state so you should always check the specific regulations in your state. There are a small number of states that have additional requirements such as a skills or a written test to drive the very large motorhomes.

  • Do class B RVs have fully functioning bathrooms?

    Many class B RVs have a full bathroom with a shower and flushing toilet. There are some RVs that alternatively offer portable toilets.

  • Is there a separate bed in a Class B?

    Some class Bs have seating areas, such as a couch, that converts into a bed while others may utilize a Murphy bed, bunkhouse, regular bed or a descending loft when it's time to sleep.  

  • Do pop-up campers have a toilet?

    Yes, pop-up campers usually have a sink, toilet, and shower but not all. It's important to work with your dealer to find the right pop-up that fits your needs.

  • Do pop-up campers have air-conditioning?

    Many are surprised to learn that many pop-up campers do have air conditioning. Some pop-up campers have rooftop units, window-mounted units or portable AC units for the pop-up.

  • Do pop-up campers have a shower?

    Yes, most pop-ups are large enough to contain either a dry or wet bath shower area. Because pop-up campers are so compact and lightweight, the freshwater storage tanks in pop-ups are smaller than other RVs so this is something to keep in mind when traveling to a campground that does not have full water hookups.

  • Do teardrop trailers have a toilet?

    Many teardrop trailers have a sink, toilet, and shower but not all. It's important to work with your dealer to find the right teardrop that fits your needs. The larger teardrop trailers have full bathroom and showers.

  • Do ice fish houses have heat?

    Yes. Ice fish houses are climate controlled so that you truly are protected from the harsh elements inside a comfortable shelter.

  • What is seasonal camping?

    Seasonal Camping is when a campsite is rented for the full season, and the occupants treat it as if it were a vacation home that they can come and go to as frequently as they wish. This means leaving the RV or park model RV on one campsite for an extended period of time, most commonly the summer camping season. For some, it’s a convenient weekend retreat. For others, it’s a seasonal getaway or yearly vacation tradition. But however you seasonal camp, it’s a great way to savor your favorite destination time and time again.

  • What is the difference between a pull-through site and a back-in site?

    RVers do become comfortable driving and backing up their RVs over time but many new RVers opt for a pull-through campsite their first few times in a campground. A pull-thru site is connected by two roads so you can pull in from one road and pull out onto another without having to back in and out of a space. These sites may not be as pretty or as private as back-in sites, but they are easier to navigate for a newbie.

  • What is the difference between dry weight and wet weight?

    A good way to think of this is laden vs. unladen weight. The dry weight is the weight of the RV with empty water tanks, propane tanks, fuel, and without any gear or equipment. The wet weight is how much the RV weighs with full tanks and equipment. This is an important distinction when you are buying an RV and comparing it with the towing capacity of your vehicle. Always check this information with your RV dealer to make sure that your tow vehicle has the capacity to pull your RV.

  • What is the difference between a wet bath and dry bath?

    A wet bath takes up less space by combining the toilet and shower in the same space. A dry bath is more similar to what you have at home. Dry baths offer additional storage and a separate shower/bathtub and toilet area.

  • How many miles per gallon will I get when driving a truck camper?

    The miles per gallon will vary by the vehicle towing the unit and camper type as well as the weight of the interior features such as granite counter tops and tables, full size appliances, and other upgrades. Generally, the efficiency of the tow vehicle's normal mpg will be reduced by a third to a half of regular gas mileage but this varies based on the factors listed above.

  • How do I get a park model setup at my preferred destination? 

    Park Model RVs are initially towed to a seasonal RV resort and placed on a site for the owner. Most RV dealers will deliver directly to the campground, and many RV park operators offer storage during off-season months, along with setup service the following spring. Once hooked up to the campground’s electricity, water, and sewer, park models generally remain on the selected site year-round. Check with your local RV dealer and preferred RV park to see if these setup and long term storage services are available.

  • What is the difference between pop-up campers and expandable trailers?

    While both types of units are typically lightweight and have open-air portions of the RV that allow the camper to feel like they are outside, pop-ups can completely collapse down to a compact size and can't be used when in this fully compact state. Expandable trailers, can't fully collapse and have enough room to move around and use without fully extending the expandable elements.

  • What is the value of the RV Industry Association seal that is on my RV?

    As you shop for the right vehicle, make sure you look for the oval-shaped RV Industry Association seal. The RV Industry Association is a national association representing RV manufacturers and parts suppliers who together produce more than 98% of all RVs manufactured in the United States.

    As members of the association, manufacturers who display the seal must self-certify compliance with more than 500 safety specifications for electrical, plumbing, heating, fire, and life safety established under the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Standard for Recreational Vehicles. Manufacturers are subject to periodic, unannounced plant inspections by RV Industry Association representatives to audit their compliance. Members who fail to maintain an acceptable level of compliance can be expelled from the association, which prohibits them from displaying the seal on their products.

    Association members display gold and black seals on Motorhomes, silver and black seals on Fifth-Wheel and other Travel Trailers, and white and black seals on Truck Campers and pop-ups.

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